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[Justice] [Political] [Spiritual]
Travesty of Justice
by Marianne Williamson
Posted October 2, 2021

Judge Loretta Preska travesty of justice

Judge Loretta Preska openly sides with big oil

One of the most compelling court cases in recent years is the prosecution of human rights and environmental lawyer Steven Donziger by Chevron Oil.

Yes, you read that correctly.

A multi-national fossil fuel giant was able to use a US courtroom to prosecute – and sentence to prison! – a Harvard educated environmental lawyer who led a team that successfully challenged their criminal drilling practices in the Ecuadorian Amazon. The case has sent shivers through the environmental movement, signally as it does the viciousness with which oil conglomerates will come after those who dare to threaten their hegemony.
Donziger before his sentencing today

In the 1960’s Texaco Oil began illegal drilling in Ecuador, intentionally saving $3 a pit by refusing to line them. This caused devastating carcinogenic effects on water, food and air – on which thousands of farmers depended for their survival. Chevron bought Texaco in the year 2000, yet when the Supreme Court of Ecuador handed down a judgement of $9.5B that Chevron owed in compensation to the Ecuadorian farmers, the company refused to pay the judgement – and decided to come after Steven Donziger instead!

Chevron deliberately polluted water supplies

Chevron deliberately polluted water supplies

The saga of Chevron’s perversion of the law and denial of justice for the people of Ecuador reached a new chapter as Donziger was even denied bail pending appeal of the decision. His legal team has one week to challenge that denial and if he loses he will have to report to federal prison for six months to appeal while incarcerated. While this is another slap in the face to environment justice, Chevron, their lawyers at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, Kaplan, Preska and Rita Glavin of Seward and Kissel have only succeeded in generating more support for Donziger and the movement for justice in Ecuador. More…

The Facts:
A transnational corporation was able to use a US courtroom to prosecute – and sentence to prison! – a Harvard educated environmental lawyer who led a team that successfully challenged their criminal drilling practices in the Ecuadorian Amazon. The Biden Administration’s Dept fo Justice has refused to intervene in this case.

Reflect On:
Now that corporations can use the judicial system to imprison environmental lawyers, what would be your recourse if your water supplies were contaminated by a corporation? Would the judicial system represent the interests of the corporation or the victims?